The rare hybrid Solar Eclipse

Did you miss the total solar eclipse on Sunday? If you were outside Africa, then most probably you did. But fortunately, you can log on to the online observatory Slooh.com and watch the not-so-instant replay of the event from the remote Kenyan.

Astronomer Paul Cox narrated this even under a partly cloudy sky, although he got a little choked up at the moment of ‘totality’, when the moon completely covered the sun. Cox was so caught up by the spectacular view as he said, “There’s totality, and it still looks wonderful through the clouds. That’s amazing.”

The background of the video is filled with his fellow observers in Kenya cheering as the clouds part slightly to make the eclipse visible. The whole timing lasted almost 14 seconds. The sun was just in time for the people to witness totality. Cox got emotionally carried away for a while, but to be fair, any astronomer would have been by the view.

The moment of totality of the Nov. 3, 2013 solar eclipse, as viewed from Owiny Village in Uganda. The photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T1i camera, using a Tamron f/2.8 28-75mm lens, unfiltered. Credit and copyright: Helen Lin.

The moment of totality of the Nov. 3, 2013 solar eclipse, as viewed from Owiny Village in Uganda. The photo was taken with a Canon Rebel T1i camera, using a Tamron f/2.8 28-75mm lens, unfiltered. Credit and copyright: Helen Lin.

The eclipse was also visible from the Eastern Seaboard of the United States, parts of Southern Europe and everywhere in Africa. Plenty of photographers took pictures of the spectacular vision and some of the best shots can be seen here.

It was a very rare eclipse and made its way over North America, Europe and Africa. People of Kenya and Nairobi had the best view. This solar eclipse was a rare hybrid of annular and total eclipses, which means the extent to which the moon blocks the sun depends on your location in the world. Such an eclipse was seen last in April 2005.